Why People are Scared of the Covid Vaccination

from: My Shot ll Hamilton Animatic YouTube

There are some valid reasons people have to the Covid -19 vaccinations, getting the most information might be our best shot.

We now have three vaccines to fight COVID19. Moderna, Pfitzer and Johnson & Johnson’s versions have proven to be effective. Nature Medicine surveyed 19 countries and only 71% of the population surveyed said they would take the vaccine.  As Americans hit drive-throughs, pharmacies and hospitals, people are excited that relief is on the way but not everyone is getting the vaccine. Why not?

It came quick. For some, there is the fear that the vaccine was rushed. In the past, a vaccine would have taken years to develop, test and bring to the market. Because of the global pandemic, the trials and tests were placed at the front of the line.

There is always an overall phobia of doctors and needles. Let us not pretend that everyone is comfortable going to the doctor’s office. It probably goes back to when we were kids, and the only good thing about the physician experience was the occasional lollypop and Spider-man band aid that we could show to our other siblings.  

We are also dealing with the sentiments of the anti-vaxx movement as seen in a 2019 April 19th   interview with Insider.Com, where Dr. Peter Hotez outlines the views of the movement,  “It’s this massive propaganda campaign and by some estimates there are almost 500 anti-vaccine websites on Facebook. They weaponize Amazon… we are seeing real public health damage being done.” That was the kind of disinformation we had before the worldwide pandemic. What are we going to face next?

We take the wait and see approach. There are those who are awaiting to see what happens to everyone else, which is not a bad stance. People over the age of 65 years and those with underlying conditions are vulnerable, so we need to be mindful that our refusal to vaccinate could affect them, especially those in daily interactions with the public.

“If we can get to 80% population immunity by the end of the summer, then we won’t see a surge next winter because this is basically a winter respiratory virus and it’ll be back unless a significant percentage of the population get vaccinated,” said Dr. Paul Offit. Can we get to herd immunity if we take the wait and see approach?

It is a personal decision, but let us make it a smart one. If we ado or do not get the vaccine, let us reach out to valued healthcare professionals and ask them to help. Our doctors have more medical history than we do personally looking at any random article found on the internet.  There are vaccine-educated practitioners in every hospital. Let’s get us get the most information possible and make the best decisions. 

CDC Information on Covid -19 inoculations

by Dane Flanigan

ultraHealth Agency

Too Fast Too Soon

Mentally Leaving the Pandemic

Photo by USA Today

There have been five hundred and fifty thousand deaths from COVID-19 in the United States and 2.81 million worldwide, according to the (New York Times March 31, 2021). When we address the issues, let us remember that it is global disease and the measures taken by governments in many countries have largely been to prevent more deaths.

There is a mental fatigue from the pandemic, affecting overall health.  It is from staying indoors and not seeing friends or family no matter where you live or what country you are in.  There is also the loss of work and income, and the impact on long-term financial stability while trying to pay one’s current bills.

We should also remember that the younger generation facing social issues and the difficulty of hanging out with friends. Now we have family or at home schooling. To be at home with one’s parents and siblings must be frustrating at times, and our youth, like some adults, are not able to hold part-time jobs.

What do we do?

COVID-19 has not gone anywhere. If we compare this pandemic to the Spanish Flu from 1918 – 1920, we see that the number of deaths was estimated to be at least 50 million worldwide with about 675,000 occurring in the United States (from CDC.org). We understand the gravity of the pandemic, but can we afford mentally, physically, and financially to remain in the pandemic mindset?

If we look at the recent Spring Break in Miami, it’s been hard for young people. The parties, the drinking, and the having fun are things we all miss. Yes, there is also the destruction, fights, and recklessness that we cannot condone nor can we overlook the transmission of the virus it may have caused.  YouTube Video Should we have totally canceled Spring Break and closed our bars and restaurants?

Let’s go back to the debate on mental health and leaving the pandemic. There is a physical leaving and a mental staying in place.  Traveling, vacations, getting out with people and going to our usual places help maintain our mental health. It is also about the planning and the anticipation. If we take that away, then mentally we lock ourselves indoors.

As we ponder the situation in America, we are seeing a rise in COVID Cases. Some European countries are already looking at their fourth wave and we are seeing the lockdowns begin. Let’s not forget the direct impact of the disease – the rampant death – but also what has been done to us on global level both mentally and physically.

by Dane Flanigan ultraHealth Agency

Staffing post Covid-19

Staffing post Covid-19 will be a shift in Healthcare like no other. 

The need for job fulfillment of positions such  physical therapists, occupational therapists, and even speech therapists have been put on the back burner the last few months, and the demand had shifted toward the need for respiratory therapists among ICU physicians and nurses, RNS, and so on. 

The pandemic has caused the cancellation of voluntary and non-emergency procedures, and  In California, thousands of nurses, doctors and other medical staff have been laid off or furloughed or have taken a pay cut since mid-March. 

According to Federal Labor Statistics:

“Employment declined by 2.5 million in education and health services in April. In health care, employment declined by 1.4 million, led by losses in offices of dentists (-503,000), offices of physicians (-243,000), and offices of other health care practitioners (-205,000).”

As the pandemic continues to flatten, and the shelter in place is lifted,  we’re going to see surges in COVID cases which will result in sudden urgent needs for healthcare personnel.  This is where healthcare staffing companies come in. A sense of trust and dependability has been created due to staffing agencies abilities to deliver help during this critical time.  That won’t change post Covid-19. We are still here to help. 

At ultraHealth Agency, we want to be a part of rebuilding our healthcare system by getting people back to work. We are here to provide quality healthcare professionals as well mental health and wellness resources for all. We want  to hear from you, let us know how we can help. 

ultraHealth Agency, Medical Staffing Beyond Expectations

ultraHealth Combats Covid-19

ultraHealth Agency has announced a set fee for the hiring of medical staff during this time of worldwide crisis. The Pasadena, California based company that focuses on elite staffing of medical professionals says that they realize the importance of staffing for hospitals and care facilities.

\”Above all we are here to help and although we do have a business to operate, we feel as if we can be of service to the community. It is our social responsibility to do God\’s work and help the best way we can. \” Dane Flanigan ultraHealth Agency CEO. https://ultrahealthagency.com/hirenow

ultraHealth Agency, is an elite medical staffing company that focuses on a white glove approach of employment recruiting, offering services that go above and beyond traditional placement, staffing medical professionals with hospitals and specialty care facilities.

ultraHealth Agency sources California based medical professionals that are credentialed, compassionate, and professional. The companies has over 10 years of staffing experience with their Director of Talent Acquisition, Julia Samaniego leading the helm in recruiting and human resources.

For more information please contact ultraHealth Agency
@ 877-390-0992 info@ultraHealthAgency.com https://ultrahealthagency.com/

ultraHealth Agency
680 E. Colorado
2nd Floor
#2103
Pasadena, CA 91101
Myke Wright
877-390-0992

Medical staffing for hospitals and care facilities during the Covid-19 crisis.

How to Highlight your Resume During a Job Interview and Nail that interview !

In one of my last blog posts I wrote about how to nail a virtual interview. As we approach the end of this month and hopefully soon, the end of this pandemic, I wanted to give some tips for nurses to nail their next in person interview. I’ll also go over some great resume resources, this will help put your best foot forward and stand apart from the competition.  

1. Study Common Nursing Interview Questions and Answers

Whether you’re applying for a job at a hospital or clinic, chances are management will be asking you similar questions in the interview.

One of the best interviewing tips for nurses is to study these questions in advance and prepare your answers. Some questions that might come your way include:

  • What is the most difficult part of being a nurse?
  • Do you like working alone or with a team?
  • What would you do if a patient was constantly complaining about pain?
  • What are your top skills/weaknesses?
  • Where do you see yourself in five years?
  • Why do you want this job?

2. Dress the Part

Always, always, make sure you dress the part. Clothing plays a big role in your confidence and self-esteem, meaning that one of the biggest interview tips for nurses is taking your outfit seriously.

I am all for personal style and expression. For the initial interview it is best to wear something more business formal. Make sure you feel comfortable. When you feel good about how you look it’ll boost your confidence and you will be ready to take on anything that comes your way. 

3. Know your resume front and back!

If you don’t know what is on your resume , you may become nervous and tend to glance down at your resume to verify your job history and education when they ask. The interviewer will pick up on your nervousness if you keep glancing down to verify your job history and education. Its always best to memorize all the details so you come off as cool and collected when asked about yourself.

Its best to walk into the interview with both your cover letter and resume. When writing your cover letter, try to remember the following :

  • Avoid “To whom it may concern.” Know the name of the person who does the hiring.
  • Tailor your letter to the employer. Mention their mission statement and how your goals match. Tell a brief personal story that illustrates why you want to work in a particular area, and list any unique skills pertinent to the position.
  • Thank the reader for his/her time, and include your phone number.

Your success will largely depend on how you present yourself in your nursing resume. Listed below are a few pointers to remember: 

  • DO use the chronological format for your work experience. List jobs starting with the most recent. If experience is limited, focus on skills, special activities, volunteering and association with professional organizations.
  • DO use good quality paper without designs or borders. Use 1-inch margins, 12-point type, and an uncluttered look. Use bullet points.
  • DON’T include a photo or list health, hobbies, marital status, family information or your GPA. “Recruiters tell us that …you can have a high GPA, but that doesn’t make you a good clinical nurse,” Cardillo says.
  • DON’T list references or say “References available upon request.” This is understood.
  • Always bring a hard copy

4. Ask Questions

Never feel uncomfortable about asking questions. Always remember to ask questions. The interview isn’t just for the interviewee to learn more about you. 

Asking questions will put you in a position to learn more about the position, where you will be working, and whether or not it’s right for your personal and professional needs. By all means ask whatever you think will help you, such as the work culture, job responsibilities and overtime pay.

5. Research the Facility

Always research the facility ahead of time. This will eliminate a potentially embarrassing situation of asking a question in the interview that could have easily been looked up online. This potentially could come off as not being prepared. 

6.  Be Yourself

Everything above is crucial, but at the end of the day, its important to be yourself. If you get hired, the persona presented during the interview. As a nurse you already possess such great qualities. Allow that to come through during the interview, if you are authentic, it will come off as such. 

You got into nursing because you love helping people – not because you love interviewing.

Even for the most experienced nurses, Interviews can be tough. Try to keep these points in mind when you go for your next interview. The goal is to help you calm your nerves, play it cool, and walk away with your ideal nursing job.